August 4, 2016 at 9:12 pm ·

Exploring our Valley: Coyote Research Facility

Today in “Exploring Our Valley”, we went to the Coyote Research Facility, and the Wellsville area. 

More on the Predator Research Facility (aka: Coyote Research Facility)

Scientists at the National Wildlife Research Center Logan, UT, field station are studying the ecology and behavior of predators in an effort to identify                                                                                     new management techniques and strategies, especially nonlethal tools. Research efforts are directed towards reducing livestock depredations and                                                                                        damage caused by coyotes, bears, and wolves, resolving conflicts in urban areas, and mitigating impacts of predators on wildlife populations.                                                                                                   Station research incorporates a variety of techniques that integrate novel engineering approaches and basic knowledge of the biology of predator species.

The station was established in 1972, and operates in close collaboration with Utah State University (USU). In fact, some of the biologists                                                                                                maintain offices on campus. The station’s most prominent feature, however, is the Millville Predator Research Facility. The 165-acre site, also on USU land,                                                                        allows employees to care for up to 100 adult coyotes involved in learning, behavior, and physiology studies. Examples of current and recent studies based at the                                                               Millville facility include the following:

  • Coyote behavior in captive environments
  • Urban conflicts with black bears
  • Coyote movements
  • Sterilization of coyotes to reduce predation on pronghorn and livestock
  • Coyote foraging and learning
  • Fladry to prevent wolf depredation
  • Coyote and elk interactions
  • Conditioning bears from campgrounds
  • Wolf damage to livestock.
  • Coyote wariness of humans
  • Coyote interactions with bobcats, kit fox, and cougars
  • Non-invasive mark-recapture of Mexican wolves
  • Coyote food habits and prey fluctuations
  • Coyote reproduction

More information can be found at: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/wildlifedamage/programs/Coyote Research Facility

Coyote Research Facility

Beautiful Wellsville Mountains & the beautiful harvest time fields.

Coyote Research Facility

Coyote Research Facility in Millville

Coyote Research Facility

View of the beautiful Wellsville Mountains from the Coyote Research Facility

Coyote Research Facility

Fields near the Coyote Research Facility. It;s a pretty ride. This was also the Firefighting command station for the Blacksmith Fork/ Millville Fire a couple of years ago. These fields were full of tents, firefighters, and helicopters fighting the huge blaze.

Coyote Research Facility

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June 21, 2016 at 8:38 pm ·

AWHC:American West Heritage Center

In celebration of our Fur Trapper/Mountain Man week we went to the AWHC for our Friday Ride. Although the Center is a very large working historical farm, they have a beautiful (FREE!) Welcome Center that is very accessible. It has a little museum that talks all about the pioneers, indians, and other significant people and history of our valley. There is beautiful art to see, a fun gift shop, and a Bison watching deck! We had a wonderful time! The building itself is beautiful, and worth just seeing the construction. If you have a moment stop by and see this amazing building, and museum….. if you have more than a moment and can get around a little easier, stop and explore the entire working farm! See all kinds of animals, farming equipment, ride a little train, and explore the buildings! You won’t be disappointed! 

For more information visit: https://www.awhc.org/

American West Heritage Center 4025 S. Hwy 89-91 Wellsville, UT 84339  
(435) 245-6050
 
*Their website has fun interactive learning! Stop by and learn about our valley and more!
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Tipi at American West Heritage Center

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Beautiful Wellsville Mountains

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Bison! Look close there’s a baby in there!

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Wellsville Mountains

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Old Pioneer Cabin

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Old Pioneer Cabin

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A peacock greeting us with a loud “hello”!

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Museum: Inside a Tipi

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Having fun in the museum with Polly and Betty

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Polly in a beautifully painted mural

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Inside a trapper’s camp.

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Ruthie is all smiles!

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Inside a Pioneer cabin.

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Cute Betty!

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Inside an old farmer’s shed.

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Beautiful decorated buffalo pelt.

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“Buffalo” watching. (We know they are called “bison” but we prefer buffalo!)

AWHC

Beautiful valley!

AWHC

AWHC

Enjoying the museum and beautiful welcome center!

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June 21, 2016 at 3:00 pm ·

Willow Park Zoo

We love Willow Park Zoo! We had an awesome time (and a huge group) go for a fried chicken picnic, and some animal time. We partnered with Common Ground Outdoor Adventures, and was able to talk all our Jazzy and wheelchair Grandfriends! The weather was perfect, the food was yummy, and the critters were active! Couldn’t have asked for a more perfect day! For more information about Willow Park Zoo, visit: http://willowparkzoo.wix.com/home

Willow Park Zoo

Ruth enjoying the sunshine & the birds.

Willow Park Zoo

Enjoying the Zoo

Willow Park Zoo

Fun in the Sun!

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Anita enjoying a walk in the shade.

Willow Park Zoo

Ruthie enjoying a beautiful day!

Willow Park Zoo

Irene and Betty

Willow Park Zoo

Tina and Polly watching reindeer and peacocks.

Willow Park Zoo

Charlene & a peacock (can you see him on the roof?)

Willow Park Zoo

Tina and Polly

Willow Park Zoo

Alice and Dee going to watch some monkeys

Willow Park Zoo

Time for some fried chicken, coleslaw and watermelon!

Willow Park Zoo

Some yummy lunch.

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Yummy!

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A nice sunny day!

Willow Park Zoo

We all agree, this looks like one angry bird!

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Arlene enjoying the animals

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Willow Park Zoo: http://willowparkzoo.wix.com/home

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June 20, 2016 at 7:28 pm ·

Exploring Our Valley: “The Secret Road”

Today in “Exploring Our Valley” we went to Hyrum Dam, and through Paradise to one of our favorite drives.  Our Grandfriends call it ” The Secret Road”. This beautiful drive connects Paradise to Mount Sterling on a beautiful gravel road that takes you to tall rolling hills and patch worked farmland.  In the Spring it’s covered in bright green fields and all colors of wildflowers! You also see ponds, small streams, beautiful horses, and a gorgeous old abandoned  house tucked in the trees. It’s a beautiful drive as you pass Sportsman’s Paradise and loop around past Hyrum Dam. If you have a free moment, grab an ice cold lemonade, roll the windows down and enjoy the ride! You won’t be disappointed!

Secret Road

Hyrum Dam

Secret Road

Hyrum Dam

Secret Road

Hyrum Dam

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Sportsman’s Paradise

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Sportsman’s Paradise

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Mount Sterling “Secret Road”

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Mount Sterling “Secret Road”

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Mount Sterling “Secret Road”

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Mount Sterling “Secret Road”

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Mount Sterling “Secret Road”

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Mount Sterling “Secret Road” Wildflowers

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Mount Sterling “Secret Road” Wildflowers

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Mount Sterling “Secret Road” Wildflowers

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Mount Sterling

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Mount Sterling

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Mount Sterling

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Mount Sterling

Sportsman’s Paradise: http://www.whitesranch.com/

History of Sportsman’s Paradise:

Whites Ranch in Paradise, Utah was settled in 1868 by Barnard White an immigrant from England. This was one of the first settlements in the beautiful Cache Valley.  The homestead, approximately 56,000 acres, was located in the southeast corner of Cache Valley consisting primarily of mountain property.

The Ranch House, stables and creamery were located on a bluff overlooking the fertile river bottoms of the Little Bear River.  This location was chosen because of its isolation and vantage point to overlook the valley.   Remembering, of course that the west was still unsettled in the mid 1800’s and the Native Americans were still formidable neighbors.  Another reason for choosing this location was the abundant springs located just below the bluff line where the Ranch House stood; as a year round water supply was paramount to any settlement in those years for the livestock and the settlers.

Over the years and through the generations, this working ranch has produced cattle, hogs, turkeys, milk, crops and rainbow trout.  Today this working ranch produces cattle, crops, trout, pheasants and partridge.  The fourth generations working the ranch are Grant and Tom White.

In the 1920’s the Little Bear River and the springs were put to use as a resource of their own.  The Little Bear River ran through the center of the bottomland and each spring the river was washing away and eroding the best bottomland. Since there was little hope of reclaiming the damage, the best solution was to turn the ravages of nature to an advantage. The river was diverted along the western side of the valley along the mountain.  This left an empty channel through the middle of the river bottoms that generated the idea of a family recreational fishery.  The Whites began developing the springs and diverting them into the empty channel.  As time went on, family, friends and other people came from miles around to fish the ponds.  The trout that were caught were sold to the fisherman.  The fishery grew from these humble beginnings to the nation’s fourth largest producer of Rainbow Trout both fresh and frozen.  As late as 1989 the Whites were producing in excess of seven million pounds of trout annually.

In 1990 the fishery began to turn full circle – forced by the state government – into massive and costly disease disinfection and the fishery was forced in a different direction.  This was the beginning of a massive restoration project.  The goal was to create a unique self-sustaining totally natural fishery complete with spawning beds and invertebrate production areas.  Utilizing the original natural stream beds, the spring waters now flow as they did in the late 1800’s.  The stream restoration is an ongoing project to ensure the streams and still waters are providing plenty of invertebrates to keep the fish healthy, active, and impressive in size.  The mixture of Browns, Rainbows, Cutthroats, Steelhead, Splakes and Cutbows provide an unmatched fly-fishing experience.  The fish will range in size from the naturally spawned fingerlings to as high as sixteen pounds with an average of eighteen inches.  Any fish, under 18 inches, have been naturally reproduced by the fishery.  The fishery is managed as a wild fishery practicing catch-and-release for fly rod only.  The two miles of streams and spring-fed lakes provide unlimited opportunity for year-round trophy fly-fishing for wild trout.

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May 13, 2016 at 10:45 pm ·

Cookout at 1st Dam

Cookout at 1st Dam

We were so excited about our first cookout of the season. There was a little drizzle, but we weren’t complaining, especially since there was an 85% chance of rain! The morning was beautiful, and although not completely warm and sunny, warm enough to enjoy all the beauties of nature! Of course, there were a lot of ducks and geese to feed, and we had a good time feeding them healthy fruits and veggies. It was a great day to kick off the warm weather season. We went with our friends from Common Ground that make it possible to transport and accommodate all of our Grandfriends no matter what their abilities. It’s going to be a great Summer, and we can’t wait for all the picnics, parades, canoeing, and day trips! 

  • If you have never been to 1st Dam, it is at the mouth of Logan Canyon and it is beautiful. There is also, a 2nd & 3rd Dam further up the canyon, each has its own areas for picnicking, fishing, camping, and hiking! We are so blessed to live in an amazing area. Like we always say: “Logan Canyon is our playground!”
Cookout

Anita enjoying the spring sunshine.

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The ladies feeding the ducks some fresh lettuce. (because bread is bad!)

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1st Dam

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Having fun and eating some yummy hamburgers!

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Lilian loves EVERYTHING in nature. She’s a little disappointed it’s too cold to go swimming.

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Lots of ducks and geese!

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Betty enjoying the walking trails.

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Eva enjoying some lunch.

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Happy for some sunshine.

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Rescue Duck

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Polly & one of our friends from Common Ground.

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Char is happy to be outside!

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Little beggars!

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“I wouldn’t mind a bite of your cookie Ma’am”

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Grandfriends & Common Ground Friends!

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Geese

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Don’t burn those!

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Lunch is almost ready!

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Lunch is served! Delicious grilled hamburgers and hot dogs, homemade potato salad, cookies, chips, and all the fixings! Our tummies are super happy!

Cookout Cookout

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March 31, 2016 at 5:55 am ·

Cache Valley Rides

Cache Valley Rides: Spring & Baby Animals

On this ride we headed out on Valley View highway through the marshlands. This time of year you can see lots of Canadian Geese, and all kinds of ducks and small birds in the water.

We headed out through Benson. It is calving season, and there are lots of fields with “baby moos” (as the Grandfriends call them). It is fun to see them all gathered together in a small group under the watchful eye of their mothers.

Traveling north we saw a group of beautiful white geese nesting. Did you know that geese mate for life with the same partner? We also saw lots of horses, unfortunately, no babies. We saw a couple flocks of sheep, with some lambs.

Out near Trenton there is a domesticated elk farm. There were several babies in the field. We were lucky because they were so close to the road. There is another domesticated elk farm in Willard that has a lot of elk to see! If you are ever in the neighborhood of the Fruit Stands, it’s worth a stop at the Apple Creek Amish Store, and a few more minutes up the road to see them all grazing in the field.

We are so lucky to live in such an amazing valley that is beautiful in every season!

If you have time, get out and have your own Cache Valley Ride Adventure! 
Cache Valley RIdes

Geese laying on eggs in the marshes of Benson

Cache Valley RIdes

Benson marshland

Cache Valley RIdes

Elk near Trenton. One is sticking it’s tongue out. These mamas had babies playing in the back field.

Cache Valley RIdes

A smiling horse that came over to the bus to say “hi” when we opened the doors. (yes, that is a true story!)

Cache Valley RIdes

Baby “Moos”

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November 6, 2015 at 1:25 am ·

Cox Honeyland

Have you ever been to Cox Honeyland? It’s so fun!!

1780 S. US-89, Logan, UT 84321

Store Hours:

Mon-Fri 10am-6pm  |  Sat 10am-5pm

Closed Sundays and Most Holidays

Cox Honeyland

Polly looking at the real beehive!

Cox Honeyland

Fun Fall items

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A new friend….

Cox Honeyland

Alice found the perfect flavored honey!

Cox Honeyland

Picking out some fun items

http://coxhoney.com/

Cox Honeyland

Cox Honeyland

Bees, Work, Honey

Honey is the sweet fluid produced by honey bees from the nectar of flowers. Worker honey bees transform the floral nectar that they gather into honey by adding enzymes to the nectar and reducing the moisture.

Bees also manufacturer edible wax comb in the hive. The honey is stored in these wax cells (the honeycomb) in the upper parts of the hive. When the bees have filled each cell in the comb with honey the bees cover them with wax caps. At harvest time, the beekeeper extracts the honey from the comb and may also sell the wax for many products.

Bees are a social insect with a division of labor. There is one queen, 500-1000 drones and 30,000 to 60,000 worker bees. The queen may lay up to 3,000 eggs per day during the two years of her life. The worker bees are comprised of the sexually undeveloped female bees.

Another important function of the bee is the pollination of the blossoms and flowers. As they search for nectar, they transfer pollen from one flower to the next. Without bees there would not be any agricultural crops, fruit and so forth.

11988592_1006835102681213_7985371743249056585_nThe (Natural) Honey Factory

Honey is primarily composed of fructose, glucose and water. It also contains other sugars as well trace enzymes, minerals, vitamins and amino acids.

Honey is “manufactured” in one of the world’s most efficient factories, the beehive. Bees may travel as far as 55,000 miles and visit more than two million flowers to gather enough nectar to make just a pound of honey.

The color and flavor of honey differ depending on the bees’ nectar source (the blossoms). We offer three varieties of honey: Clover-Alfalfa (light and mild), Cache Valley (darker with more flavor), Mountain Snowberry (mountain wildflower flavor).

How can you be more natural than being manufactured in a beehive by the bee?

ourcompany

The Beginning, How Cox Honeyland came to “bee”!

More than 100 years ago, the story began in the small farming community of St. George, Utah with Henderson Cox. After nearly three decades, Marion Cox moved to Cache Valley where he continued to raise honey bees and harvest honey.

The first warehouse for honey production was built in Providence, Utah and continued operation there for a number of years.

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In 1965 Duane purchased the bees from his father to continue the family tradition of beekeeping and honey production. In 1984, a new warehouse was constructed on Highway 89 just on the southern outskirts of Logan, Utah. The warehouse was large enough for storage, production and packaging. And, just a few short years later in 1989, Cox Honeyland opened to offer pure, natural honey year round in their gift shop.

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November 5, 2015 at 4:48 pm ·

Halloween Recap!

October is always a fun and exciting time at Williamsburg. This year was no exception! We had a wonderful spooky time, and though we would share some pictures of some of our fun events! 
October

Wonderful Women of Williamsburg: Witch Party All of our amazing Ladies got together this month for a “witch party” we had fun treats, prizes, activities & games! It was a fun success. They loved their little witch hats. WWW or Wonderful Women of Williamsburg is our very own Ladies club that meets the last Thursday of the Month.

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Our Grandfriends LOVE craft activities! Especially “sharing crafts”. Sharing crafts are easy to make crafts that our Grandfriends can make as many as they want to make. That way they can “share” the crafts they have made as gifts, treats for kids/Grandkids or as Visiting Teaching treats! They are always a hit at Halloween!

Witch Hands

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Pumpkins are a HUGE part of Halloween! 

Wooden Pumpkins

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 GIANT PUMPKINS!!!!!!!!!!

Our local Friend & Dairy owner, Jim Seamons, grows these GIANT pumpkins! (The one below is OVER 1,000 pounds!) We have the opportunity to ride out and see these pumpkins, and hear all about how he gets them to grow this large! 

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Jim with one of his “gurls”. The beautiful gourd on top is called a Pear Gourd, and it weighs 50 pounds! We are so lucky to have amazing friends!

Sharing Craft: Tootsie Pop Ghosts! We made 56 ghosts that day! Oooooooooooooo

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The North Logan Pumpkin Walk. For the past 11 years we have been part of this huge event. This year there was a record 65,000 people! The weather was beautiful, and our scenes were a hit with the crowds. This years theme was, “That’s a Laugh”. Our scenes included Halloween Jokes, and carrying our theme over from our Welcome to Yellowstone Month in August, we did Yogi Bear, complete with “Pumpkin Geyser”!

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Happy Hour Treats! Vampire Floats & Witch Floats!

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Our Grandfriends LOVE to go for rides! They would go everyday if they could. We are so lucky to live in such a beautiful valley. Each season is full of gorgeous sights!

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Yard Haunts have been especially fun this year! Anita was excited to see her name on a tombstone, and had to get a picture with it. She also clarified, the tombstone does NOT make her look fat LOL!

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The “End”

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